HAAARCH!!! 2015

HAAARCH!!! is a yearly showcase of undergraduate research, creative work, and achievement. This forum provides students the opportunity to exhibit, present and promote their research and experiential learning activities.

HAAARCH!!! 2015 will take place in the Cloister and University Art Gallery of the Frick Fine Arts Building on March 23, from 4-6 pm.

HAAARCH!!! 2015

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    "The Japanese Nationality Room: Showcasing Japan's Cultural Past to Facilitate American Interest," by Mariah Simensky

    The Cathedral of Learning’s Japanese Nationality room highlights 18th century minka style architecture and includes a variety of cultural elements illuminating Japanese traditions of all social classes. The room, dedicated on July 25, 1999, differs in purpose compared to the other nationality rooms. Where the other rooms attempted to carve out an identity of the immigrant communities' new cultural background, a mixture between that of their homeland and the culture adopted from the United States, the Japanese Nationality Room, sought to facilitate interest in Japan and educate the people of Pittsburgh of its cultural heritage. I will be arguing that the Japanese Nationality room committee created a room acting as a tool to initiate public and international interest towards Japan and its traditions through the design of the room, one that highlights high court and working class Japanese culture, the insertion of objects, both ritual, classical, and mundane, representative of Japan as a whole, and through the archival records that demonstrate the diverse ideas of the committee members.

    My research will focus on the evolution of the design of the room from the proposed plan of two Japanese gardens in the cathedral’s inner courtyards of 1971, to the transformation of the room’s design moving from katura teahouse, to Noh theater stage, to the decided upon minka style farmhouse, and the reasoning behind the design’s transition from one to the other. I will also be investigating how the committee came up with ways to justify or assert certain cultural elements as representatives of Japanese culture over others. Furthermore, I will research how those cultural elements interact and blend together to form a seamless mixture of cultural aspects from the different social classes that shaped Japan’s history in order to prove the room as being an intended tool used to perk the interest of Japanese culture as a whole within the local community and the greater United States.

    For more information about Mariah, click here.

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    "Shifting Perspectives: Evolution of Imagery as Identity in the Hungarian Room" by Melissa Quarto

    The Hungarian Room that exists today combines folk artistic traditions with a visual timeline to narrate the nation’s complicated history. The Hungarian Committee formed in 1927, and with great enthusiasm became the first committee to put forward a donation to the Nationality Room Council and grew to include Magyars from surrounding Pittsburgh suburbs. Minutes from meetings reveal their eagerness demonstrate their historic achievements in an open dialogue between themselves and a transcultural audience.

    National symbols of Hungary, such as the Holy Crown of St. Stephen, coupled with the inclusion of folk motifs, primary references to historical agriculture products, illustrated by decorative tulip carvings, paprika red coloring the ceiling, complimenting the warmth of a tobacco stained oak veneer. The need to define their target audience, either the local ethnic community or the general city public, would consequently determine the form of the room. The Hungarian Room seeks a comprise between an aesthetic interpretation of cultural heritage recognizable to a fellow Magyar, and an educational presentation in order to educate students of Hungary’s complicated past. According to correspondence, the Hungarian Committee seeks to install a variety of objects to represent the various backgrounds that made up Hungary over a long period time, including translations of Hungarian literature, musical scores, reproductions of historic paintings, and a painted panel depicting figures important in shaping Hungary’s complicated past.. I will explore why these objectives were not met at the room’s dedication in 1939. Following the later addition of the stained glass windows in 1956, the room shifts from an inclusive, cultural perspective to a broader, informative narrative of Hungarian national history, geared towards a universal audience. What obstacles prevented the Hungarian committee for constructing an image of their cultural identity geared towards a multicultural audience in their initial actualization of the room, and through what modes were they able to rally up morale and support in order to execute the later addition of the stained glass windows?

    For more information about Melissa, click here.

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    "Czech, Slovak, Czechoslovak: National Identity in the Czechoslovak Nationality Room," by Max Adzema

    My interests have led me to research the Czechoslovak Nationality Room, in that it represents the distinct and deliberate joining of two or more peoples into a single nation.  Formed as a nation in 1918, Czechoslovakia represented a unified nation of multiple ethnicities.  However, these self-identifying ethnic groups had (and still have) very different traditions and identities, including language, art, history, and way of life.  Since the vast majority of Czech and Slovak immigrants arrived in the United States before Czechoslovakia’s 1918 creation, they were fiercely proud of their individual ethnic heritage.  They kept it distinct from the other, living in very separate communities and maintaining separate identities.  Through my research, I have found that it was a very difficult task to represent these two groups fairly and equally in one room.  I argue that, while the Czechoslovak Nationality Room attempts to paint a picture of multi-cultural “Slavic unity,” it reversely portrays a class society where Czechs have superiority over Slovaks, an issue that existed since the country’s creation.  Although the Czechoslovak-Americans that created the room may have wanted to show the harmony of a unified state (they were heavily influenced by their brethren still in Europe), they left telltale signs that Czechs and Slovaks were not thought of as equal.  The problems and benefits of uniting these two peoples into one country can be seen in the microcosm of the Czechoslovak Nationality Room, which I aim to show.

    For more information about Max, click here.

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    Max Adzema

    Max Adzema is from Pittsburgh. He is currently a senior studying History of Art and Architecture with a minor in Museum Studies.  Among other classes this semester, he is taking HAA 1010 and HAA 1020 which are exhibited in HAAARCH.  He will be presenting a thesis on the Czechoslovak Nationality Room, which investigates the challenges and benefits of having both Czech and Slovak identities reflected in a single room.

    It is entitled "Czech, Slovak, Czechoslovak: National Identity in the Czechoslovak Nationality Room."

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    HAAARCH!!! 2015 Presentation Schedule

    HAAARCH!!! 2015 Presentation Schedule
      Time Orange Stage Green Stage
    4:00 - 4:10

    Introductory Remarks: Honors Projects
    Moderated by Rae Di Cicco

    Introductory Remarks: Honors Projects
    Moderated by Kylie Jasinski 

    4:10 - 4:20

    Karen Lue:  The Politics of Display: Transnational Convergence in the Chinese Nationality Room 

    Matt Sova: Women and Empore: The Issue of Gendered Space in Ottonian Architecture 

    4:20 - 4:30

    Sarah Horton: Methodical Suffering: Chinese Buddhism as a Tool in Zhang Huan’s Early Performance Art

    Kirsten Armstrong: Spirituality of Non-Sacred Space: Sanctifying a More Socialist Agenda 

    4:30 - 4:40

    Abbey O’Brien: Radical Muralism in Three Dimensions: A Close Look at Siqueiros’ May Day Political Float 

    Allison Mosco: Religion Transformed: The Christian Roots of a Secular Russian Craft 

    4:40 - 4:50

    Grace Kelly: The University Studio: Oiticica, Rhodislandia, and Peripheral Strategies in Art Making 

    Questions and Discussion    
    4:50 - 5:00 Questions and Discussion     Questions and Discussion    
    5:00 - 5:10

    Introductory Remarks: Honors Projects
    Moderated by Krystle Stricklin 

    Introductory Remarks:HAA 1010: Nationality Rooms Moderated by Dr. Katheryn Linduff 

    5:10 - 5:20

    Kaley Kilpatrick: Flight 93 National Memorial, the African Burial Ground National Monument, and the Pursuit of Child-Appropriate Memorial Designs 

    Mariah Simensky: The Japanese Nationality Room: Showcasing Japan’s Cultural Past to Facilitate American Interest 

    5:20 - 5:30

    Alice Gallagher: Creation and Contemplation: The Flight 93 Memorial and The National September 11th Museum 

    Melissa Quarto: Shifting Perspectives: Evolution of Imagery as Identity in the Hungarian Room 

    5:30 - 5:40

    Liyi Chen: Reinforcing Femininity: Exhibiting the Empress Dowager and Marie Antoinette in the 21st Century 

    Max Adzema: Czech, Slovak, Czechoslovak: National Identity in the Czechoslovak Nationality Room 

    5:40 - 5:50

    Jonathon T. Weber: Faces of Empire: Social Discourse of Field Marshal, 1st Baron, Sir Jeffery Amherst’s Portraits Created in Life 

    Olivia Izzo: Protecting Russia with Mystical Powers: the Russian Nationality Room 

    5:50 - 6:00 Questions and Discussion     Questions and Discussion    
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    HAAARCH!!! 2015 Exhibition Map and Schedule

    Edited by Stefan Proost

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    • UAG
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    Kieran Bell

    Kieran Bell is a freshman Civil Engineering student in the Swanson School of Engineering hoping to complete a program of study in Architecture and focus on structural engineering. He takes HAA classes as electives to fulfill requirements while working toward his engineering degree, and finds them an enjoyable and interesting departure from his normal course work. In future years Kieran would like to work CO-OP shifts for architecture and engineering firms outside of the state and even the country to gain experience in the workplace. At some point after he earns his undergraduate degree, Kieran would like to futher his degree in graduate school. His eventual goal is to work for a smaller, private company where he has freedom to interact with architects and engineers alike and work on design projects.

    Kieran and his classmates will present on a project for HAA 940 at HAAARCH 2015.

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    Joelle Weiss

    Joelle is a junior majoring in Environmental Studies and minoring in Studio Arts. She is from a town named Collegeville, home of Ursinus College. In high school, she started to develop an up-cycling hobby as well as art-making through found objects. She is an avid hot sauce consumer and puzzle maker. She constantly tries to learn more from current research and absorb the most information from class. Joelle hopes to pursue a job in sustainable design and find her place in the world outside of Western culture. Throughout her diverse experiences, she was led to see the unfortunate wastefulness and need for better systems of recycling. Joelle is a Real Food Challenge Intern at Pitt, working toward a better food system on campus that truly nourishes its students. She is also a part of the Fair Food Cooperative, supporting the distribution and consumption of local, human, fair trade, and ecologically sound food. Joelle continues to push herself to be inspired and create meaningful work in all of her projects.

     

    Joelle and her classmates will present a group project from HAA 940 at HAAARCH this year.

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    Sierra Smith

    Sierra Smith is a senior at the University of Pittsburgh, majoring in Architectural Studies and minoring in Studio Arts. Sierra decided to come to the University of Pittsburgh because its built environment was the most aesthetically pleasing to her out of any other school. Even though Sierra initially started the University of Pittsburgh as a pre-med student, her desire for Pittsburgh architecture and her experiences of traveling the world influenced her decision to pursue studying architecture Before attending the University of Pittsburgh, Sierra visited various countries, such as Italy, Spain, Germany, Ireland, and Canada, along with many other Caribbean Islands and US cities. She is passionate about how various types of cultures in different countries and cities shape their built environments and how every building tells a different story. Sierra plans on completing an internship this summer with a Pittsburgh Architectural firm. After graduation, Sierra plans to pursue a Master of Architecture degree and plans to focus on sustainable architecture.  

    Sierra will be presenting for HAA 1916 at HAAARCH.

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    Kimberly Shoemaker

    Kimberly is currently a junior, intending to graduate in the spring of 2016, majoring in Architectural Studies and Studio Arts.  During the summer of 2014, she participated in the History of Art and Architecture’s study abroad program “Architectural Studies in Central Europe” and was awarded a study abroad scholarship from the Russian and Eastern European Studies Office.  She is currently enrolled in the first ever honors level studio HAA 1918 Design Studio 3 and will be taking Design Studio 4 the fall of 2015.  Even though she is studying both architecture and studio arts Kimberly plans on attending graduate school upon graduating from the University of Pittsburgh to obtain a Master’s of Architecture Degree.  Outside of classes, Kimberly is part of the Co-ed National Honor Fraternity, Phi Sigma Pi, where she partakes in service, scholarship and social activities.

    Kimberly will present her portfolio as a selected architecture studies junior at HAARCH!!! 2015.

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