HAAARCH!!! 2015

HAAARCH!!! is a yearly showcase of undergraduate research, creative work, and achievement. This forum provides students the opportunity to exhibit, present and promote their research and experiential learning activities.

HAAARCH!!! 2015 will take place in the Cloister and University Art Gallery of the Frick Fine Arts Building on March 23, from 4-6 pm.

HAAARCH!!! 2015

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    Meghan Hipple

    Meghan is a junior majoring in the History of Art and Architecture and minoring in Museum Studies. Currently, she is a research assistant with the Visual Media Workshop where she is in the process of researching and mapping the movements of European women who travelled on The Grand Tour during the eighteenth-century. Her research is only a small part of a much larger project that digitally maps the locations, paths and overlaps of European Grand Tourists. She is also the curatorial intern at The Andy Warhol Museum, working alongside the Assistant Curator, Jessica Beck to research artists and their work for different temporary exhibitions. Over the past summer she received the Brackenridge Fellowship to research visual representations of the human body in architectural treatises that operated as tools for the formation of architectural knowledge throughout the disciplines history. Meghan assisted with the curation of the exhibition Configuring Disciplines: Fragments of an Encyclopedia, where her Brackenridge research was displayed alongside that of other HAA undergraduate and graduate students. She plans to pursue a senior thesis combining her background in the HAA department with film studies and visual culture studies that will look at the HBO anthology series True Detective. Utilizing theories already developed in film studies on the subjects of migration, landscape and identity in the dissemination of transnational film, she will work to create a structure for analyzing the meaning of gender, space and landscape in evolving American genres and television.

    Meghan will be at the Visual Media Workshop table at HAAARCH 2015.

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    "Flight 93 National Memorial, the African Burial Ground National Monument, and the Pursuit of Child-Appropriate Memorial Designs," by Kaley Kilpatrick

    Millions of tourists, including children brought along by parents or teachers, journey to dark tourist sites marked by trauma and death year after year. It is an irony that for many of these dark sites, designers boast graphics of children on project proposals, professionals exhibit photographs of children on promotional materials, and agencies release children’s activity books as if all of these stakeholders hold concern for child tourists. Yet, the way children experience the design and interpretation of a dark tourist site, nonetheless troublesome, is the focus of little attention for designers of dark sites and scholars studying them. The highly emotional and intense historical events that constitute a dark tourist site make interpreting to a young audience a heavy task. Already too young to fully understand a dark site in its wider historical context, children are not prepared to face jarring images of terrorism, to come across faces and names of the dead, or to understand the solemness of human remains included in memorial design. However, virtually no published research on children as dark tourists exists.

    This paper compares two dark sites containing human remains as a stepping stone in exploring the relationship between child tourists and dark sites that has barely awakened academic and public interest or anxiety. With an analysis of how their design features and presentations relate to children interpreting the sites, the juxtaposition of the Flight 93 National Memorial in Southwestern Pennsylvania and the African Burial Ground National Monument in New York City is revealing of a divide between design and presentation of dark sites and the actual experience of children interpreting these sites. Ultimately, the comparison exposes new principles for shaping future dark sites with appropriate designs and presentations that remain mindful of little eyes, truly exemplifying darker aspects of the human experience in a sensible manner.

    For more information about Kaley, click here.

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    Kaley Kilpatrick

    Kaley Kilpatrick is a senior pursuing a HAA major, Italian and Museum Studies minors, and a MedRen certificate.  During her time at Pitt, she’s most enjoyed being able to explore the role of art in communities.  Her senior project focuses on the relationship between children and dark tourist sites, a project complimented by involvement with the School of Education’s Flight 93 Research Team and Pitt's NYC Field Studies Program.  Kaley is thankful to have experienced HAA Teaching Assistantships, internships with Pittsburgh’s American Jewish Museum and Meadowcroft Rockshelter & Historic Village, study abroad with the Florence Cathedral seminar, and the Mary Ellen Callahan Fellowship (received for her project on museum programming for elderly individuals with dementia.)   Outside the HAA department, Kaley works in Special Collections at Hillman Library, serves as president of Tau Sigma Honor Society, and enjoys being an active member of Cornerstone Campus Ministry.

    At HAAARCH 2015, she will be presenting on her senior thesis, entitled "Flight 93 National Memorial, the African Burial Ground National Monument, and the Pursuit of Child-Appropriate Memorial Designs."

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    Frank Reichard

    Frank is a senior majoring in Architectural Studies with a minor in Studio Arts who has a love for both the built and natural environment. He gravitated towards architecture as a way to combine his passion for science, art, psychology, and nature. His main interests are discovering how architecture can affect the wellbeing of an individual, community, and the natural world. As an undergrad Frank has been involved with the Young Preservationists Association of Pittsburgh helping to document historic sites at risk of being torn down. He has also worked as a biology research assistant doing work on stream health on the Snake River in New Jersey. This past fall he has done an internship field documenting and researching the history of a building in Pittsburgh’s East End, giving him an appreciation for the story a structure can tell. Frank is thankful for the broad education and opportunities that Pitt and the Architectural Studies program have given him. After graduation he hopes to continue his education in California and eventually return to Pittsburgh to live and work in the city he has grown to love.

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    Mariah Simensky

    Mariah Simensky is a fifth year senior, double-majoring in Anthropology and History of Art and Architecture with two minors in Chinese and Japanese. She will graduate this year with an Asian Studies Certificate. This semester, Mariah is researching the Japanese Nationality Room for the HAA 1010 class. Her research paper will focus on how the Japanese Nationality Room’s intended purpose was to facilitate Americans’ and University of Pittsburgh students’ interests in Japan and Japanese culture. ​

    Click here for an abstract on her paper, entitled ""The Japanese Nationality Room: Showcasing Japan's Cultural Past to Facilitate American Interest."

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    Peixiao Liu (Emma)

    Peixiao Liu (Emma) is a senior at Pitt, double-majoring in History of Art and Architecture and Economics. She is originally from Beijing, China and currently aiming at working in arts management industry. She has chosen to study the Chinese Nationality Room for her thesis paper for the course HAA 1010. Emma will be focusing on how the Chinese Nationality Room emphasizes the great learning and teaching of Confucius and what American culture means to Chinese education.

    Peixiao Liu will attend HAAARCH on behalf of the course HAA 1010.

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    Melissa Quarto

    Melissa Quarto is a junior, double-majoring in History of Art & Architecture and Hispanic Languages & Literature. Her research for HAA 1010: Visualizing Heritage in Pittsburgh considers the construction of  a collective identity in the Hungarian Nationality Room, (ded. 1939), which explores perspectival shifts in the imagined target audience of the Hungarian community to a broader vision of a universal public, envisioned through the later addition of an informative historical timeline in the stained glass windows to the room in 1956.

     

    Melissa will be presenting her paper, entitled "Shifting Perspectives: Evolution of Imagery as Identity in the Hungarian Room" and talking about her experience in the course for HAAARCH 2015.

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    Lisa Canavan

    Lisa Canavan is a double major in Studio Arts and Art History.  After working in business and raising a family, Lisa returned to college part-time to pursue a lifelong interest in the arts.  She greatly enjoys her academic pursuits and has been recognized as a university scholar.  Memorializing the past and current life experiences are themes that inspire her artwork and art historical studies.  Besides art, Lisa spends time fostering kittens for Animal Friends shelter and training her thoroughbred.

    Lisa Canavan will be presenting on her research for the course HAA 1010: The Living and the Dead, entitled "Public and Private War Memorials: Fulfilling Different Social Needs."

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    Qiqi Feng

    Qiqi Feng is a junior majoring in Art History with minors in German and Museum Studies. Born in China, Qiqi has received education in China, Singapore and the USA. Qiqi worked for large and small exhibitions in China and the USA, and obtained internship positions in the Sixth Chengdu Biennale in 2013, and in the Carnegie Museum of Art in 2014. In the current semester, she assisted launching Exhibition^3: Documenta 5, Harald Szeemann, The Artists with the HAA 1020 Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar, taught by Dr. Terry Smith. These experiences evoked her interest in pursuing a museum-orientated graduate program. Inspired by courses with Professor Shirin Fozi, Qiqi has developed deep academic interests in medieval arts. As she will study abroad in Berlin next fall, she plans to carry out independent research on 10th-century crosses for her honors thesis on an OUR grant.

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    Isabella Sigado

    Isabella Sigado is a double major in Marketing and History of Art and Architecture with minors in French and Museum Studies. She is currently interning at the Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery and is aiming to immerse herself in as much art and as many opportunities as she can.  Although just a freshman, she is trying to gain as much experience as possible in hopes of studying abroad and interning in a museum or gallery in France. She is from Connellsville, PA and still adjusting to city life, but loving every moment of it. Her transition from country to city has inspired much of her immersion into art, as the art history department and the small Pittsburgh art scene provides a sense of belonging.

     

    Isabella will be presenting on behalf of the Museum Studies Exhibition Seminar Class, HAA 1020, taught by Dr. Terry Smith in the spring of 2015.

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